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 He never used slang in his lyrics and had intense melodic lines. Other important voices were Fiorentino, Marino, F. Ruiz, Dante, Martel, Hugo Del Carril, A. Vargas, E. Rivero, Julio Sosa, and Goyeneche.

Voices


  • Great Singers 

Some other great singers include Agustín Magaldi, Ignacio Corsini and Charlo. Corsini is remembered not only for his unique voice, but also for his political and Nationalistic themes.

He never used slang in his lyrics and had intense melodic lines. Other important voices were Fiorentino, Marino, F. Ruiz, Dante, Martel, Hugo Del Carril, A. Vargas, E. Rivero, Julio Sosa, and Goyeneche.

J. Sosa and E. Rivero were also important from the 40s to the early 60s. Their distinctive low, grave baritone voices added an unusual tone to the singing of lyrics, since up the 1940s the register of the singers were tenor or alto tenor.

They offered a new dimension at the other end of the vocal register giving relevance to the interpretation of tango. A new level of dignity and pride was achieved with a more mature music, lyrics, and voice.

Carlos Gardel
Carlos Gardel

R. Goyeneche was the voice that bridged the old and the new as an expression of the political and economic transformation that Argentina  underwent. He was a master in understanding and giving weight to each word, to the rhythmic music of the new language. He knew how to modulate the intensity and the tempo of his voice to sing tangos, many written over 50 years before and was able to give them actual life as if written today.

The role of women in tango was associated to the bordellos with a dual role of prostitutes and dancers. Lyrics reflected that type of life and was demeaning to women. Women started to sing tango without shameful feelings in the 1920s when the lyrics were written without sexual connotations such as LA MOROCHA (the brunette).

Azucena Maizani, Rosita Quiroga, Mercedes Simone (from the 1920s to 1930s); Ada Falcon, Tita Merello (from 1930s to 1940s); Amanda Ledesma, Sabina Olmos, Aida Luz, Sofía Bozan, Nelly Omar and Tania (there were more actresses in movies than singers during the 30s to 50s); Amelita Baltar and Susana Rinaldi were the stars from the 40s to the 70s.

Libertad Lamarque, daughter of a 2nd wave of immigrants, did not relate to the ill-reputed origins of tango. Starting in 1930, she imitated the upper class with her refined behavior and demeanor, her elegant female attire, the absence of smoking during performances and a delicate soprano voice that made her the darling of the middle and upper class women. In her lyrics she didn’t want to sing about the sins of the illiterate and the undignified life of single women.

She preferred to sing the grief, frustrations, aggravations, and humiliations suffered by married women, the homemaker, the mother of many children, the victim of infidelity, abuse, and economic insecurity. She also sang about the women's capacity to change their status by becoming self-supporting in the working place, something that was unimaginable for Argentinean males to accept in the 30s. Sadly, her bad relation with Eva Peron forced her to leave the country.

She continued to sing and perform as an actress in Mexico City where she became an idol too. She is still alive today, but retired from musical activities.


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